SPECIAL OFFERS

 

“BEGINNER” SPECIAL  

• Impala
• Warthog  OR  Ostrich 
• Blesbuck      
• Common Springbuck   

2 hunters (2:1)
4 trophies pr. hunter
8 days accomodation / 6 days hunting
PRICE $ 2.790 pr. hunter, ALL INCLUSIVE

1 hunter (1:1)
4 trophy animals
7 days accomodation / 5 days hunting
PRICE $ 3.150 ALL INCLUSIVE

– Great package for the first-time hunter in Africa, including 4 of the most popular trophies amongst our hunters, including the iconic Impala and the national animal of South Africa (the Springbuck)

READ MORE HERE

 

PRICE INCLUDES
An unforgettable hunting experience in Africa
All accommodation and catering, incl. beer, wine and soft drinks
Arrival and departure day
Transport to/from airport
All other transportation for the duration of the safari
Services of a Professional Hunter
Services of trackers and skinners
Services of camp staff
Laundry service
Field preparation and salting of trophies/skins
Delivery of trophies to taxidermist
All applicable taxes
All applicable licenses

PRICE EXCLUDES
Airline tickets to/from South Africa
Taxidermy work and shipping
Gratuities for staff

– “No hit – no pay concept”
– Extra animals can be added to package during hunt 

Warthog:

The warthog is a rather common member of the wild pig clan. A distant cousin of the European boar, he is a popular trophy with many safari clients. He favors open ground, grasslands, water holes and pans, and will often be seen in the open woodlands. He especially likes to graze on the newly sprouted grass of a burned out area. The name comes from the wart-like protrusions on his face; two on the female and four on the male. Tusks vary in size, but can become very long on the female and often curve high over the snout. The constant meshing of the upper and lower tusks against each other keep them razor sharp, making the warthog a dangerous adversary.They live most often in deserted antbear dens which they dig out with their hoofs and clear out with their shovel-like snouts. Piglets enter the den head first while the adults back into the burrow. Not dependent on water, the warthog will drink if it is available. Wallowing in the mud is his favorite pastime. The goal for hunting warthog ranges from the trophy tusks and hide to delicious meat and bait for hunting the leopard. One of the toughest of African game, the adult can weigh in at over 250 pounds. This unique member of the swine family is almost an exclusive grazer; not at all territorial, he wanders wherever he pleases. Found in small family groups called “sounders”, mother and piglets stay together for some time (up to 3 years); the boar joins the group for mating.

Ostrich:

While hunting ostrich is often an overlooked endeavor by foreign hunters, the hunting of ostrich is actually very challenging and a great experience. The Ostrich has a small brain compared to its body size (only weighing 40 gram), but extremely large eyes (weighing 60 gram each), which can detect the slightest movements up to 3,5 kilometers away. This makes stalking an ostrich (especially in herds) very challenging.

Ostrich is mainly pursued for the hide and meat. The hide/skin of the ostrich though, is widely used as exclusive and exotic leather, very popular in boots or belts. The leather can also ideally be used for furnitures or anything else within your imagination. If you do not wish to have the skin tanned as leather, the trophy is often made as a shoulder mount, with wings spread. The back skin, will still be available to be tanned and made into a number of very attractive leather goods. The meat of the ostrich is taken mostly from the upper legs and the neck and is considered extremely delicious by some.

Impala:

Hunting impala is on the agenda for just about every hunter who sets foot on the ‘dark continent’. The rooibok (red buck), as he is known in Afrikaans, is the bread and butter antelope of Southern Africa. He is commonly used for camp meat, bait for leopard, and just to ‘cut the teeth’ of the new African hunter. This graceful, medium-sized antelope is a sociable herd animal that frequents open woodlands, the bushveld, and the mopane scrub. Both a browser and a grazer, he will never venture far from water, as he must drink daily. The lyre-shaped horns are only carried by the rams, but the herd’s propensity to bunch together in the dense brush can make it easy to make a mistake. 

Hunting impala is best accomplished in the autumn rut when the best rams are usually found within the breeding herds. Be aware of the rooibok’s keen sense of hearing and smell, not to mention his superb eyesight which all account for the need to make cautious and calculated stalks if you intend to “close the deal” on this quarry. A couple more tips regarding hunting impala: he is most active during the cooler times of the day (early morning and later in the afternoon). Consider an ambush near known feeding areas. Exercise great caution when hunting impala, as when alarmed, they will herd tightly together, making it easy to shoot more than one with a single shot.

Blesbuck:

The blesbok lives on the open plains of the South African highveld. Primarily grazers, they form herds consisting of females (ewes) and juveniles, while the males (rams) tend to be solitary. The neck and top of the back is brown, darker on the flanks with a white belly. A small white blaze on the forehead and a larger blaze below is usually divided between the eyes. With both sexes carrying horns, care must be taken when hunting blesbok to ensure that you take the animal of choice. The best time for hunting blesbok is while they are grazing in the morning or late afternoon. Like many other species, they tend to lay-up during the hottest part of the afternoon. Hunting blesbok on the plains can be challenging, as your shots may need to be quite long. The blesbok shares a common behavioral characteristic with his cousin the bontebok – that of standing together with heads facing toward the sun and faces low to the ground. He sometimes shakes his head violently, stamps and runs in a complete circle only to resume his original place. As available water is essential to this specie, hunting blesbok near the approaches to water holes can prove productive.

Springbuck:

The springbok is probably the only true gazelle found in the sub-region of Southern Africa. These beautiful little antelopes inhabit the more western reaches of Southern Africa. Once their numbers were in the millions, however, today they are confined mostly to the game reserves and game ranches. Both the males and females of this unmistakable little gazelle carry horns, the ewe’s horns being somewhat shorter and more slender. 

The national animal of South Africa, his name means “jump buck”, an accurate description of his pogo-stick style of jumping when alarmed. This social herd animal is at home on dry, semi-desert, open grasslands, including the Kalahari. He is both a grazer and a browser and not dependent on water, although he will drink daily if water is available. When hunting springbok, trophy evaluation can be very difficult; as mentioned, both rams and ewes carry horns, and herds can be very large and thus hard to approach with all those eyes and ears trained on the hunter. Because of his phenomenal eyesight and his natural paranoia with regard to being approached, if you try to walk and stalk this little antelope, be prepared to do some crawling while hunting springbok. Try setting up ambushes on the approaches to feeding areas and pans, or even physical barriers such as fences. 

If you can approach in open terrain within 250 meters, you are doing well and best take your shot. The flat-shooters will be the ticket when hunting springbok. Look to calibers that will propel a 120-grain expanding bullet in excess of 2600 fps.

    

TROPHY SPECIAL #1 

• Kudu  OR  Oryx
•Blue Wildebeest  OR Black Wildebeest   
• Zebra 
• Common Springbuck   

2 hunters (2:1)
4 trophy animals pr. hunter
8 days accommodation / 6 days hunting
PRICE $ 4.590 pr. jæger, ALL INCLUSIVE

1 hunter (1:1)
4 trophies
7 days accommodation / 5 days hunting
PRICE (1:1) $ 4.850 ALL INCLUSIVE

– Here is the opportunity for a great hunt, with 4 of the most wanted trophies in South Africa, including either the aggressive Black Wildebeest, or the Blue Wildebeest which has truly earned its rightful name as “The Poor Man Buffalo”.

READ MORE HERE

PRICE INCLUDES
An unforgettable hunting experience in Africa
All accommodation and catering, incl. beer, wine and soft drinks
Arrival and departure day
Transport to/from airport
All other transportation for the duration of the safari
Services of a Professional Hunter
Services of trackers and skinners
Services of camp staff
Laundry service
Field preparation and salting of trophies/skins
Delivery of trophies to taxidermist
All applicable taxes
All applicable licenses

PRICE EXCLUDES
Airline tickets to/from South Africa
Taxidermy work and shipping
Gratuities for staff

– “No hit – no pay concept”
– Extra animals can be added to package during hunt 

Kudu:

Hunting kudu remains on the top of the list for just about every hunter who comes to Africa. He is probably second only to the impala as Africa’s most sought-after plains game trophy. The kudu is a big antelope with a stately bearing. He is strikingly beautiful, with long spiral horns that set him apart from all other of the antelope species. The ‘grey ghost’, as he has been nicknamed, sports a coat of pale-grey to brownish-grey with white vertical stripes down the flank. He has a distinctive white chevron marking between his eyes, which set off the very long spiral horns carried only by the bulls. Kudu cows look very similar to the males and, while they lack horns, their ears are quite prominent and beautiful. Both sexes display white beneath the tail and have a conspicuous hump on the shoulder. Hunting kudu is best accomplished in the bushveld, where leaves, fresh sprouts, seedpods, and fresh grass are abundant.

The kudu tends to browse in the early morning and late afternoon, usually resting during the heat of the day. Like many of the antelope species, this majestic giant tends to form family groups of 6 to 12 individuals; mostly cows and calves, with the bulls only joining the herd during mating season. The bulls form bachelor herds or become solitary. This is a graceful animal in flight and extremely athletic; he can jump remarkably high for his size. In spite of those long horns, the bulls can travel at great speeds through the bush by laying their horns low along their backs. Hunting kudu can be extremely challenging, as the ‘ghost’ is very sly and extremely elusive with exceptional senses. Look for spoor around pans and water holes as he drinks regularly and will never be far from water. Because the depth of the curl of individual bulls’ horns can vary so much, trophy assessment can be difficult.

Oryx (Gemsbuck):

The giant oryx or Gemsbok, as he is more commonly known, is a magnificent animal. He inhabits the open country and can survive in the harshest of conditions. A native of the Kalahari, he can go without surface water for months, absorbing moisture from what he eats. A social herd animal, he is primarily a grazer but will occasionally browse if necessary.

Extremely aggressive and very dangerous when injured, cornered, or threatened, both sexes carry very long spear-like horns. The female (cow) of the specie tends to be slightly smaller in body. Her horns, however, though more slender, are most often longer than those of the male (bull). The cow’s horns tend to curve slightly backward, while the bull’s horns are thicker and straighter. In assessing the trophy, remember that the cow’s horns tend to be longer and will often out-score the bull. Hunting gemsbok requires a good pair of boots, as you are apt to cover a lot of country. This open country will demand one of the flat shooting rifle and scope combinations. Always alert with excellent eyesight, hearing, and smell, your approach will have to be carefully planned. This is one of the tough antelope – the .270 caliber should be considered the minimum, with a good quality 150 grain bullet. The 7mm and 30 caliber Magnums are an even better choice. Spitzer bullets will work well out in the open country, but if you are hunting gemsbok in the bush, heavy-for-caliber round nose bullets at modest velocities will bust through the brush without the risk of deflection.

Beware of the predominant humped shoulder; it will try to trick you into shooting too high. Follow the back line of the front leg to about one third into the body and squeeze. Never shoot above the horizontal midline of this beautiful antelope unless you are in need of a good day’s hike.

Blue wildebeest

Hunting blue wildebeest, or the brindled gnu, as he is also known, can be most exciting. This large, bearded antelope, native to the acacia savanna and short grass plains is often referred to as the ‘poor man’s’ buffalo. His numbers have dwindled somewhat in many of his old habitats, but he is as plentiful as ever on the Serengeti ecosystem where his numbers may well exceed one million. The game ranches of southern Africa maintain managed populations of this ‘beest’, which offer wonderful opportunities for hunting blue wildebeest. As both sexes carry horns and are of similar body size and color, sorting out the bulls from the cows can sometimes be difficult. Look for heavier muscled individuals with thicker horn bases and more droop.

Older bulls will usually appear darker in color with wider stripes. Mature bulls can weigh as much as 600 pounds. On the open plains, the wildebeest is easy to locate from a distance, however, hunting blue wildebeest in the bushveld is quite another story. In the bush, he can be elusive and shy; a good technique is to walk slowly into a suspected resting area into or across the wind glassing well ahead for movement. This is one tough antelope; hunting blue wildebeest with less than .270 caliber and a good 150-grain bullet is not recommended. In open country, the flat shooting .300 magnums with 200 or 220-grain bullets are an excellent choice. Hunting blue wildebeest in bushveld conditions may well call for even larger calibers and heavier bullets. The prominent hump on the shoulder and the mane may often lead to a body shot placed too high.

When hunting blue wildebeest, always try to position yourself for the side-on shot; draw up the back edge of the front leg and place the shot about four inches (a hand’s width) above the point of the elbow. This ‘high heart’ shot will take heart and lungs; the animal will rock to the shot and probably go down within 50 yards. If your shot placement is not quite on the mark, be very cautious in a follow-up. This critter can be extremely dangerous when wounded. Approach a downed wildebeest from the ‘off’ side with great care, as they have been known to get up and charge.

Black wildebeest:

At first glance, hunting black wildebeest may seem rather easy, as on the open plains where he is often found, he will be relatively easy to locate. However, closing the distance on him may be an entirely different matter; his excellent senses and herd instinct make hunting black wildebeest quite a challenge. This member of the antelope family is an ox-like animal with unusual horns, a beard, and hair on his nose. He is dark brown in color with a horse-like tail, which is almost pure white. As such, he is sometimes referred to as the white-tailed gnu.

These strange looking “beests” occur naturally only in South Africa. With both sexes carrying horns, it sometimes takes quite a bit of patience to distinguish the bulls from the cows. Hunting black wildebeest is most likely best pursued during the morning or late afternoon while the herd is grazing. During cool weather, they will graze anytime, but when it is warm, they tend to rest during the hottest part of the day.

Caution is the “watch word” when hunting black wildebeest, as he can be very aggressive when mating, disturbed, or wounded. This ‘clown of the plains’, as he is often referred to, will often be seen trotting in circles and chasing other members of the herd. Hunting black wildebeest in open terrain calls for a minimum of .270 caliber with a good 150-grain bullet. The 7mm mag or one of the .300 magnums is an even better choice. These guys are tough, so always use heavy-for-caliber premium bullets. Follow the back edge of the front leg and place your shot one third up into the body, never more than half way up. Hunting black wildebeest in bushveld conditions may well call for even larger calibers, like the 9.3mm or the .375. Your Professional Hunter will be your best guide here.

Zebra:

The Burchell’s zebra is distinguished from the other zebra species by several pattern features. First and foremost are the shadow stripes, which occur within the broad white stripes found on the hindquarters; he lacks the grid-iron pattern and the dewlap, which is typical on the other species. Sex determination can be very difficult; males will generally be slightly larger and have more developed necks, but more than one professional hunter has shot a stallion that instantly became a mare once downed. Glass carefully when hunting zebra; if alerted, the stallion will most often trail the herd as they withdraw – this may be your best and only indication.

The Burchell’s favors the open woodlands and grassy savanna; he avoids the thick bushveld and the desert if possible. Always found where water is abundant, he drinks regularly and cannot take advantage of even the most lush grazing if water is not available. The zebra forms small herds, usually 8 to 10 in number, consisting of a stallion, several mares and their foals. Surplus males are ejected from the herd and form bachelor herds.

Their main enemy is the lion and they will actively defend the herd, kicking violently and ganging up on the attacker. When hunting zebra, sex is often not specified on the permits, as sex determination is difficult. As already mentioned, in flight, the herd will be led away by one of the mares, with the stallion as rear guard; he will often stop and look back – there is your shot. When approaching water, the stallion will most often be in the lead, and when grazing, he will usually stay on the outskirts of the herd. These habits may be useful when hunting zebra. Good glassing may be essential in trophy assessment. If it is the flat skin you are after, be advised that the old stallions will most likely be battle-scarred and worn. Look for a younger male or a mare if a nice clear hide is what you seek. Hunting zebra is best in the early morning or late afternoon. Regular drinkers, set up an ambush on trails leading to water holes or pans.

Springbuck:

The springbok is probably the only true gazelle found in the sub-region of Southern Africa. These beautiful little antelopes inhabit the more western reaches of Southern Africa. Once their numbers were in the millions, however, today they are confined mostly to the game reserves and game ranches. Both the males and females of this unmistakable little gazelle carry horns, the ewe’s horns being somewhat shorter and more slender. 

The national animal of South Africa, his name means “jump buck”, an accurate description of his pogo-stick style of jumping when alarmed. This social herd animal is at home on dry, semi-desert, open grasslands, including the Kalahari. He is both a grazer and a browser and not dependent on water, although he will drink daily if water is available. When hunting springbok, trophy evaluation can be very difficult; as mentioned, both rams and ewes carry horns, and herds can be very large and thus hard to approach with all those eyes and ears trained on the hunter. Because of his phenomenal eyesight and his natural paranoia with regard to being approached, if you try to walk and stalk this little antelope, be prepared to do some crawling while hunting springbok. Try setting up ambushes on the approaches to feeding areas and pans, or even physical barriers such as fences. 

If you can approach in open terrain within 250 meters, you are doing well and best take your shot. The flat-shooters will be the ticket when hunting springbok. Look to calibers that will propel a 120-grain expanding bullet in excess of 2600 fps.

     

COASTAL HUNT SPECIAL

• Bushpig
• Caracal 
• Bushbuck
• Warthog

8 days accommodation / 6 days hunting
1:1 hunt including 4 trophy animals

PRICE $ 4.500 ALL INCLUSIVE

– This exiting hunt will take place at the coastal areas of The Eastern Cape. The hunting will be a mix of driven hunts with dogs, hunting from blinds over bait and walk & stalk.

READ MORE HERE

PRICE INCLUDES
An unforgettable hunting experience in Africa
All accommodation and catering, incl. beer, wine and soft drinks
Arrival and departure day
Transport to/from airport
All other transportation for the duration of the safari
Services of a Professional Hunter
Services of trackers and skinners
Services of camp staff
Laundry service
Field preparation and salting of trophies/skins
Delivery of trophies to taxidermist
All applicable taxes
All applicable licenses

PRICE EXCLUDES
Airline tickets to/from South Africa
Taxidermy work and shipping
Gratuities for staff

– “No hit – no pay concept”
– Extra animals can be added to package during hunt  

Bushpig

The bush pig is the African equivalent of the European wild boar. He also bears similarities to the feral hogs, common in many areas of the US. While he tends to be somewhat smaller than both his European or North American counterparts, he shares the same nasty disposition and aggressive behavior, common to most wild members of the swine family. The bush pig is an extremely hairy animal which resembles the domestic hog. His color varies from grey-brown to dark brown which becomes even darker as he ages.

His sharp tusks are relatively short when compared to his cousin, the warthog, and he lacks the facial warts. In addition, his snout is much more narrow and his ears more pointed. Males tend to be slightly larger than females and they reside in groups of 6 to 12 with a dominant male and female and several other females and juveniles.

Hunting bush pig will take you to the thickets and dense underbrush, where they lay-up during the daylight hours. They are most likely best hunted during the night over bait, as this is the time where they are most active.

Caracal

The caracal, or ‘rooikat’ (red cat) as he is known in Afrikaans, is a relatively small lynx-like creature, a bit like North America’s bobcat. He is stockier than his close cousin (the Serval) and his fur varies from light red to a rather dark brick red. He is characterized by a rather short tail and prominent, distinct tufts on the ends of his ears. Males and females are relatively the same size. Primarily a nocturnal creature, he can sometimes be spotted during daylight hours on cool days. The rooikat preys mainly on birds, small mammals and reptiles, but has also been known to take medium-sized antelope such as the duiker or steenbuck.

Here in The Eastern Cape, hunting the caracal is more often done during the day by using dogs, which will pick up his sent and chase him into a three – A very exiting hunt. A spotlight at night over bait can sometimes be effective. Predator calls can also be employed and can be an effective method to getting this wary feline to show himself.

Bushbuck

The bushbuck is the smallest member of the spiral-horned antelope. He is medium-sized and dark reddish-brown with white spots on the rump, against the legs, at the base of the neck, and just below the throat. Hunting the bushbuck can be a real challenge, as he is shy and extremely elusive. For the most part solitary, he prefers riverine forest and dense thickets always near a water source, as he must drink on a daily basis. Primarily a browser, he feeds during the night or early morning and late afternoon on leaves, grass, branches, flowers and fruit.

Weighing in at between 80 to 140 pounds, only the males carry horns and mature bucks are considerably larger and usually darker in color than the female of the species. When spooked, his alarm signal is a loud, hoarse, dog-like bark. Hunting bushbuck can be very similar to hunting the American white-tailed deer; still-hunting can be very productive, or one might try moving quietly through the bush, probing the dense cover, always being cognizant of the wind direction.

Warthog

The warthog is a rather common member of the wild pig clan. A distant cousin of the European boar, he is a popular trophy with many safari clients. He favors open ground, grasslands, water holes and pans, and will often be seen in the open woodlands. He especially likes to graze on the newly sprouted grass of a burned out area. The name comes from the wart-like protrusions on his face; two on the female and four on the male. Tusks vary in size, but can become very long on the female and often curve high over the snout. The constant meshing of the upper and lower tusks against each other keep them razor sharp, making the warthog a dangerous adversary.They live most often in deserted antbear dens which they dig out with their hoofs and clear out with their shovel-like snouts. Piglets enter the den head first while the adults back into the burrow. Not dependent on water, the warthog will drink if it is available. Wallowing in the mud is his favorite pastime. The goal for hunting warthog ranges from the trophy tusks and hide to delicious meat and bait for hunting the leopard. One of the toughest of African game, the adult can weigh in at over 250 pounds. This unique member of the swine family is almost an exclusive grazer; not at all territorial, he wanders wherever he pleases. Found in small family groups called “sounders”, mother and piglets stay together for some time (up to 3 years); the boar joins the group for mating.

 

BUFFALO PACKAGE

7 days accommodation / 5 full days hunting
1 trophy buffalo bull
1:1 hunt with Big Five PH

PRICE $10.800 ALL INCLUSIVE

The Cape Buffalo is considered by some to be the most dangerous of all of the Big Five. While he seems docile enough when viewed undisturbed in the herd, when agitated or wounded, this beast can be extremely aggressive, vindictive, and cunning. Hunting buffalo in Africa is not for the faint hearted and is extremely exiting – Once you try this, you will know what we mean!

READ MORE HERE

PRICE INCLUDES
An unforgettable hunting experience in Africa
All accommodation and catering, incl. beer, wine and soft drinks
Trophy fee on 1x buffalo bull
Arrival and departure day
Transport to/from airport
All other transportation for the duration of the safari
Services of a Professional Hunter
Services of trackers and skinners
Services of camp staff
Laundry service
Field preparation and salting of trophies/skins
Delivery of trophies to taxidermist
All applicable taxes
All applicable licenses

PRICE EXCLUDES
Airline tickets to/from South Africa
Taxidermy work and shipping
Gratuities for staff

– “No hit – no pay concept”
– Extra animals can be added to package during hunt 

Cape Buffalo

Found all over southern Africa in herds of various sizes, the buffalo can weigh up to 1800 pounds. He is primarily a grazer but an occasional browser who must drink every day. They favor the thick bushveld during the day, leisurely moving and grazing as they go. At night they tend to herd up to protect the young from their archenemy, the lion. Both sexes carry horns, however, the horns of a bull can be quite spectacular in spread, with a deep curl and a solid boss covering the forehead. Cows lack the boss, but can have a very wide spread; in fact, the world record buffalo on file in the Roland Ward record book is a cow with a spread of some 62 inches.

With a well-placed shot, a rifle of .375 caliber is minimum recommended. However, a shot from the various 40 calibers provides a more immediate and noticeable effect. Even with a well-placed first shot, once the Cape buffalo is wounded and its adrenalin is flowing, he can be EXTREMELY hard to bring down. It has been said that if your first shot on “Inyati”, as the Zulu people call him, is a bad one, the next 14 will only serve to further annoy him… Remember, when it comes to shot placement and your selection of rifles and bullets, always trust the judgement of your Professional Hunter